Triad Arpeggios on guitar

Major Triad Arpeggio Shapes

Major triads are built using the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes of the major scale.

While playing triads of triads may sound like they would be easier than 7th chords (and chords with other extensions), since they only contain 3 notes, it’s often not the case. While there are less notes to remember, the fact that many patterns only have one note per string can make them more challenging for your picking hand.

In the charts below (and throughout this course), the charts are labeled with the interval number.

R = Root Note

1 = 1st

3 = 3rd

5 = 5th

 

Major Arpeggio Shapes

These diagrams do not show any fret numbers, as these patterns can be used starting with any note on the fretboard as the root note.

For most of the examples, we’ll look at two 1-octave charts, and then follow them with a diagram putting both together to form a 2-octave arpeggio.

In the Two-Octave arpeggios below, the solid colors show you the chord shape. It’s important the learn arpeggio shapes in relation to the chord shapes.

You’ll notice that the diagrams start and end with the root note. Start by playing them up and down repeatedly. Play them at a slow enough speed where you can play them flawlessly. Only after you can play them well at slow speeds, gradually increase your speed. Play along with a metronome.

One Octave

Two Octaves

 


One Octave

Two Octaves

 


One Octave

Two Octaves

 


One Octave

Two Octaves

 


One Octave

Two Octaves

 


One Octave

Two Octaves

 


One Octave

Two Octaves